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Scramble for Fun...

Royal Enfield Scram 411

Royal Enfield Scram 411

Scramble for Fun...

Royal Enfield Scram 411

Published:Updated:
Royal Enfield Scram 411

Royal Enfield as a brand has been super active off late. There is always a market abuzz with something or the other to talk about. Never ever leaving the limelight. The brand has been skillfully navigating the multitude of ever-growing segments. And the Royal Enfield Scram 411 is their latest addition to this fast-evolving list.

Though Yezdi has also brought a slew of products including the Adventure, Scrambler and Roadster, it does feel a step behind the Chennai based brand.

The Scram 411 is essentially a stripped-down variant of the successful and much-loved Himalayan. This machine is set to fill the vacuum which existed in this super niche segment.

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We were invited to ride the Scram 411 on the highways around Bangalore and at the Big Rock facilities to get a taste of the off-road. After riding the motorcycle on asphalt, dirt and broken roads, we have come to the definite conclusion that this is one heck of a motorcycle!

Royal Enfield has used the Himalayan as a platform to design this new machine. Working towards building a scrambler, with all that goes with the scrambler culture. The design team has jettisoned some of the excess baggage on the Himalayan to give the bike a more purposeful appearance. While it does look like a Himalayan, it surely feels lighter than the Himalayan, long before you have thrown a leg over the saddle.

Design elements of the motorcycle have been moved around on the Scram. The round headlight now is set alone, without the need of an entire assembly to connect it down the sides of the tank. This makes the new bike look much sleeker from the front. The fuel tank is still quite big at 15-litres, which is more than the Yezdi Scrambler, its immediate competition.

The ergonomics of the bike seem to have been tweaked ever so slightly to make urban warfare that much easier. The bike also gets a long single-seat, rather than the split seats on the Himalayan. This gives a different look to the Scram, while at the same time being comfortable for the rider. Though we didn’t test it, we do think the pillion seat should be comfortable as well for medium-range rides.

ஒட்டுமொத்த விகடனுக்கும் ஒரே ஷார்ட்கட்!

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Saddle height is also lower than the Himalayan at 795 mm, which makes it much more accessible to a number of riders. It sits lower than the Yezdi as well. This will surely be a boost to the confidence of shorter riders as well.

This machine does not have a pop-out console. The single-round instrument cluster looks good and you can get trip navigation as an optional for this bike. This is from the Meteor 350. The tail of the bike has been streamlined as well. The handlebar is of the same width, but now closer to the rider, giving it a more controlled posture for city riding. Unlike the Himalayan, luggage mounted racks will not be available on the Scram 411.

One of the biggest differences we feel is the wheel size. The front-wheel goes from 21 inches on the Himalayan to 19 inches on the Scram. The smaller front hoop makes changing direction easier in slower speed city traffic, though it increases the challenge of roots and rocks in the dirt. But this is a trade-off that makes a lot of sense for the scrambler edition. If a rider is going to be so dirt focussed, then they are better off with the Himalayan.

The heart of the bike remains unchanged with the 411 cc engine remaining unchanged as on the Himalayan. This mill belts out 32 kgm of torque at 4250 rpm and 24.3 bhp of power at 6500 rpm. The engine could possibly have been used in a different state of tune to make it more hooligan friendly!

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Though this engine is bigger than the Yezdi Scrambler, it produces less power than the 29.1 bhp of the Yezdi. Which makes it somewhat an awkward product positioning, at least on paper. The power delivery is linear and you feel it pushing you forward at a nice easy pace, never hurrying you up unnecessarily.

The company claims a top speed of 125 kmph, we could only whack out an indicated 110 kmph. Importantly, we hit those speeds without experiencing excessive vibrations. Here again, the Scram gets a 5-speed gearbox compared to the 6-speed employed on the Yezdi.

While riding the Scrambler on the trails of Hard Rock, I could feel the suspension working overtime to keep things in control. Front fork travel has been reduced by 10 mm on the Scram as compared to the Himalayan. The rear shock has the same amount of travel but in a slightly different setup. It is of course not as stable as the Himalayan but does the job of a scrambler well enough.

Ground Clearance also goes down by a whopping 20 mm to 200 mm. It is more than enough for city riding, but you wish for it on the trails. The bike gets dual-channel ABS, but it cannot be turned off for the rear wheel in the dirt, which is a shame for a scrambler. We would love to have the rear float around in the dirt. After all the stripping, the Scram 411 loses just 5 kg to the Himalayan, which isn’t quite enough. It needed to be leaner to make urban life easier.

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Royal Enfield has priced this bike at INR 12000 less than the Himalayan. It is also a few thousand less than the Yezdi Scrambler. Without fixating on the price, we don’t think that should be a deal maker or breaker. The selling point of this Scram 411 is the number of colour options available. The essence of a scrambler is to look good and RE has helped its cause by offering quite the variety. It also comes with the company’s MIY (Make It Yourself) scheme to help you customise your motorcycle more to your preference.

So, which should you go for? The Yezdi Scrambler or the Royal Enfield Scram 411? It is difficult to say, the market for scramblers currently is too tiny for a head-to-head. Both of these models are more likely to be cannibalising sales from their own company machines, rather than beating each other up!

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